Pussy: A Reclamation

A woman’s body is a living, breathing altar.
— Regena Thomashauer

In this feminist self-help book, Thomashauer offers a humorous look into her own life, using her personal experiences to educate the reader about the “power of the pussy”.  She unpacks this word with grace and playfulness, using ancient myths and modern day culture to explain the importance in embodying the goddess within, believing that when women find pleasure in their own lives their radiance begins to shine outward and they’re able to live a life of abundance that will spill unto the lives of those they surround themselves with.  As the Director and Founder of the School of Womanly Arts, it is Thomashauer’s intention to offer the reader the same information she provides in her Mastery program. 

Thomashauer uses the term of “turning on” when talking about women coming into their full honest selves, whether it is through romance, movement therapy, living out their true passions, finding success, etc.  She believes that the ultimate power belongs to the woman, not the man.  She says, “We’ve been held hostage by a patriarchal culture that devalues turn-on and uses women’s erotic brilliance in service to the masculine.  Yet the erotic is where a women’s confidence lives, where her power is sourced, where she connects to her deepest feelings and longings (pg. 19).”  Further explaining the term ‘turn-on’ to mean feeling a sense of your own aliveness, or your life force; the unity of spirit and body; the ability to reach for pleasure (especially when it seems difficult); being in your right mind and your highest power; feeling full, complete, and whole.

When we are turned on, we are able to connect with other turned on women and create an honest and supportive sisterhood.

This book had a lot of great tools and practices to offer in order to help ourselves or our surrounding female friends in need of pushing out negative thoughts, stale energy and reminding each other of our power and self-worth.  This can be done through movement and making noise to release what doesn’t serve you anymore.  Thomashauer explains, “When we push our edges and fully express the storm that is passing through our being, we experience ecstasy and joy.  Such an emotional storm clears out the cobwebs (pg. 154).”  This concept of moving the body to release the energy that lies within that doesn’t serve the individual anymore is something that strongly resonates with me, and my work.  “By feeling my feelings and moving them through my body every day, I stay in touch with my ever-changing emotions and ready to express whatever comes up (pg. 157),” Thomashauer says.

By deepening the understanding and awareness of the self, Thomashauer believes that women are able to be their best selves.  She points out that by following her practices and assignments takes a lot of work and requires an extreme sense of responsibility for one’s life, but the reward is an extreme sense of ownership of one’s destiny and day-to-day life.

This book was a wonderful, witty read that had great information.  Thomashauer does a wonderful job explaining the necessary work that each woman needs to do in order to shine, live fully, and hold space for true, healthy female bonds.